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  1. #1
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    PSX PSX texture palettes (Fix)

    Hi everyone! First of all, sorry if this is not the right place to post this.
    And sorry for my English, is not my native language.

    I have a question about PSX TIM textures.

    I used several programs to rip the textures from Silent Hill 1 disc,
    but every program extract the TIM file into several png images with different
    colors, each image is a different layer and each layer corresponds to a
    different color palette, this is an example of one of the textures that i
    extracted from the game ISO using JPSXDEC program:






    As you can see, JPSXDEC converted this TIM file into a several PNG images, it has 15 layers, it looks that
    every image has wrong colors, but thats not correct. Each image has a unique color for
    each item, like handgun, cloths, skin etc.

    i had to use Photoshop to cut the wrong colors in each layers and then merge
    all the layers into a single image to have a full color texture like this:



    My question is, is there any program or tip to fix this automatically and not doing it by hand in Photoshop with every image i extract?

    This game has more than 700 TIM files and each TIM file has several textures layers inside, so is a pain to fix every texture by hand.
    Thanks in advanced
    Last edited by Giro; January 1st, 2016 at 19:19.

  2. #2
    Moderator Cyberman's Avatar
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    The playstation uses palletes for creating textures. This is one of the reasons people have a hard time making high resolution textures for PS1 games.
    The pallete data is stored in multiple locations and that is one of the main reasons it is difficult.
    This does however allow the playstation to have reasonably good graphics for it's day considering how simple a machine it was.

    I was researching ways to automatically identify such data for HRT (High Resolution Textures) however it wasn't "slam dunk" easy. In fact it was on the "somewhat complicated side".
    Anyhow FF9 had a lot of TIMs in it as well. The only method for finding the texture pallete and data is when it is used. Not when it is loaded. A TIM is nothing more than a bitmap (litterally) and how that bitmap data is used is entirely up to the software using it. The pallete data is generate 16bit BGR data, however the texture data can be 4 or 8 bits per pixel. Rarily will you see actual 16bit data as it consumed too much space on the CD hence TIMs were used (because that was the developers library storage method) as block data and the loaded TIM data was stored into display memory. The image was rendered to a different pain err pane (fruedian slip). Some games actually rendered images to other display locations and used those in the PS1 visibible area as textures. (Think mirror affects.)

    Anyhow I digress, no easy way as it is completely application dependent how the TIM data palletes are used.

    Cyb
    Progress (n.):
    The process through which the Internet has evolved from smart people in front of dumb terminals to dumb people in front of smart terminals.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyberman View Post
    The playstation uses palletes for creating textures. This is one of the reasons people have a hard time making high resolution textures for PS1 games.
    The pallete data is stored in multiple locations and that is one of the main reasons it is difficult.
    This does however allow the playstation to have reasonably good graphics for it's day considering how simple a machine it was.

    I was researching ways to automatically identify such data for HRT (High Resolution Textures) however it wasn't "slam dunk" easy. In fact it was on the "somewhat complicated side".
    Anyhow FF9 had a lot of TIMs in it as well. The only method for finding the texture pallete and data is when it is used. Not when it is loaded. A TIM is nothing more than a bitmap (litterally) and how that bitmap data is used is entirely up to the software using it. The pallete data is generate 16bit BGR data, however the texture data can be 4 or 8 bits per pixel. Rarily will you see actual 16bit data as it consumed too much space on the CD hence TIMs were used (because that was the developers library storage method) as block data and the loaded TIM data was stored into display memory. The image was rendered to a different pain err pane (fruedian slip). Some games actually rendered images to other display locations and used those in the PS1 visibible area as textures. (Think mirror affects.)

    Anyhow I digress, no easy way as it is completely application dependent how the TIM data palletes are used.

    Cyb
    Gpubladesoft 1.44 plugin can replace textures but only subhd for now it seems

  4. #4
    Dcemu.co.uk guy LyonHrt's Avatar
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    is psx texture format in bgr? i know ps2 is, really don't want to be messing around right now lol

    - - - Updated - - -

    http://www.irfanview.com/ bulk converts bgr to rgb easily
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyonHrt View Post
    is psx texture format in bgr? i know ps2 is, really don't want to be messing around right now lol

    - - - Updated - - -

    http://www.irfanview.com/ bulk converts bgr to rgb easily
    No PS1 uses TIM format http://wiki.qhimm.com/view/PSX/TIM_format .


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